Most Recent Event

“Moon of the Scarlet Plums”- Crazy Horse

Japanese Noh theatrical experience produced by Theatre of Yugen (SanFrancisco)
collaboration with American Indian Dance Theater and Tiny Alice (Tokyo)

Part of 2005 World Festival of Sacret Music – Los Angeles
www.festivalofsacredmusic.org

Friday, 8 pm. September 23, 2005
Jamese Armstrong Theater in Torrance California

PlumsMasashi Theatre of Yugen’s world theater production, Moon of the Scarlet Plums, is a Japanese Noh and Native American collaboration, inspired by the story of the 19th century Oglala Sioux hero, Crazy Horse. The show is directed by Yuriko Doi, composed by Richard Emmert, with songs by Darrell Paskimin and choreography by Hanay Gieogamah of the American Indian Dance Theater, Jane Lind and Masashi Nomura. Written by Erik Ehn with material from John Neihardt’s Cycle of the West and Black Elk Speaks, with potent symbols and evocative performances, this production crosses cultural boundaries and offers a theatrical experience that spans space, time and place.
It evokes the powerful spirit world of Japanese traditional Noh Theatre and Native American art forms in telling the story of a young Native American who searches for identity and spiritual vision in our contemporary times. The music and instrumentation is based on Noh structure and is combined with Native American singers, drums and flutes.

This program was co-presented by the Torrance Cultural Arts Center
Foundation and Collaboration with Theatre of Yugen and Tiny Alice(Tokyo).

News Release:
Most intriguing international collaborative work came to Torrance in September 23rd as a part of the World Festival of Sacred Music of Los Angeles.

It was presented at James Armstrong Theater in Torrance, CA. Friday, Sep.. 23 at 8:00 p.m. The Torrance Cultural Arts Center Foundation with cooperation with Japanese Traditional Performing Arts Organization presents this performance as its first event of 2005/06 Season program. Tickets were $33 and Students & Seniors $30. It was purchased at the theater box office (310) 781-7171 or online www.torrancearts.com.

Moon of the Scarlet Plums – Crazy Horse is inspired by the Native American story of the hero of the Lakota Sioux in the 19th Century as told through the powerful ritual of Noh theater. With potent symbols and evocative performances, the production crosses cultural boundaries and offers a theatrical experience that spans space, time and place. It evokes the powerful spirit world of Japanese traditional Noh Theater and Native American art forms and tells the story of a young, distant descendant of the great warrior Crazy Horse who searches to find her identity and her own spiritual vision in our contemporary times. The music and instrumentation is based on Noh structure but is fused with Native American singers, drums and flutes. Stylized forms of chanting and movement from Native American and Noh theater, along with dance and Native American sign language will evoke a unique experiences for theatergoers. The performance was in both English and Japanese with super titles.

The spiritual cultures of Native American and Japanese Noh theater will experimentally blend the two different traditions into a creative and inspiring world stage experience produced by Theatre of Yugen (San Francisco) working in collaboration with Tiny Alice (Tokyo) and American Indian Dance Theatre (US). Directed by Theatre of Yugen Founder Yuriko Doi with specially composed Japanese text and Noh choreography by Japanese Intangible Cultural Asset, Shiro Nomura. .

The production features the work of Kanze-lineage Noh master Masashi Nomura as Crazy Horse; native American film and stage actress Jane Lind (Aleut;) Noh drummer Eitaro Ohkura; the choreography of Hanay Geiogamah (Kiowa/Delaware), Artistic Director of American Indian Dance Theatre; Cree singer and composer Darrell Paskimin; and Cree drummer and singer Adrian Cross from Alberta. Other distinguished actors and dancers who were also performing included Jack Kohler (Yurok/Karuk), and Theatre of Yugen Joint Artistic Directors Jubilith Moore, Lluis Valls, and Libby Zilber.

International tour start at the World Expo in Aichi (Japan); Theatre X (Tokyo); City College of San Francisco; Eliot, Maine, as a traditional-style outdoor torchlit performance; and at the last stop Torrance, California, as part of the Los Angeles World Festival of Sacred Music. Workshops and lecture-demonstrations will be offered at the various locations as well.

In Los Angeles, Noh theater lecture-demonstration was presented by the Shumei Arts Council in Pasadena as its first event of their 2005/06 Season program. And Workshop of Native American was sponsored by the City of Torrance Community Service Department. Both on September 22, at 7:00. Free of charge. Reservation required.

Workshops information:
1. Noh Music and Dance Lecture-demonstration by Masashi Nomura (noh dance),Richard Emmert ( noh flute) and Eitaro Ohkura (ohkawa-hip drum) from Japan at Shumei Arts Hall in Pasadena, 2430 E. Colorado BLVD., Pasadena, CA 91107. phone (626) 584-8841
For more information, please go to www.shumeiarts.org/events.html
2. American Indian Dance and Muisic Workshop by American Indian Dance Theatre members at George Nakano Theater, Torrance Cultural Arts Center, 3330 Civic Center Drive, Torrance California 90503, phone (310) 618-2935

Theatre of Yugen was honored to receive highly competitive grants from the Japanese government’s Bunka-cho (Agency for Cultural Affairs) and the Japan-United States Friendship Commission for the Japan-US tour. Founded in 1978, Theatre of Yugen is the only company in the United States working experimentally with the over 600-year-old Japanese forms of theater: Noh and Kyogen. The theater’s emphasis includes intercultural fusion works, as well as ensemble-created experimental works, infusing the avant-garde sensibilities inherent in Noh and Kyogen with contemporary and classic plays.

For over 15 years American Indian Dance Theatre has been a pioneer in bringing authentic traditional American Indian dance and music to the world and an innovator in placing them in a theatrical setting. Under the artistic direction of renowned playwright, director and producer Hanay Geiogamah the company has performed to acclaim throughout the US, Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and Australia, and has made two television specials for PBS’ Great Performances.

The play first premiered in 2001, then entitled Crazy Horse, as part of the US-Japan 21st Century Project and performed to standing-room-only crowds on the weekend of the September 11th tragedy. The reviews from Oakland Tribune “A never-ending source of fanciful delight— the true genius comes from its tremendous visual aesthetic.”